Poetry and Technology: Good Friends

By Thomas DeVere Wolsey

At first glance, poetry and digital technology might not seem to have much in common. In this post, we learn that the two are friends from way back.  For example, Poets.org, in 2004, suggested that lines of poetry can be integrated into an email signature. It’s just one way to make poetry visible and accessible.

Kevin Hodgson wrote last week on the Middleweb blog about the digital poetry books his students created. They used Google Slides as the venue, and explored various forms of poetry. Along the way, they learned to attribute sources, design slides that are visually appealing, and use hyperlinks to put the reader in the driver’s seat.

Digital Poetry Books

Digital Poetry Books

“The end result was a win-win-win: I not only had my students engaged in the writing of poetry across various forms, but also they were able to use technology to publish a digital book of original writing, learning along the way about how the World Wide Web works, how to use elements of web design for writing, and understanding the need to attribute art to the original owners.” http://www.middleweb.com/22690/how-we-took-poetry-writing-into-digital-spaces/

Teacher Keri McAllister created three technology-based work stations to help students learn more about poetry as they listened, commented on, and created poetry. Her poetry workstations included the iPod workstation, the techy workstation with blogging, and the podcasting workstation. Click the photo below to hear Keri talk more about her use of technology to teach students about poetry on Teaching Channel.

McCallister

Keri McAllister on Teaching Channel

Brett Vogelsinger, on Teachthought.com, suggests several ideas for engaging students with poetry with technology as the vehicle.  Two that stand out to me are the use of Pinterest and PollEverywhere. Using PollEverywhere, according to Brett, permits students to explore the power of word choice, a key attribute of poetic forms.

If you want to explore the ways technology and poetry get along further, Edutopia provides several suggestions for using technology to celebrate poetry. Their list includes links to a poetry listening booth where students can listen to poems read aloud by the poets, a tool for finding poets near you, and an online poetry publisher from Scholastic.com. Do you students use iPads? Check out this list of poetry apps.

Read more on Literacy Beat about eye poems and Evernote, too here and here.

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Webwatch: iGameMom, Games for Learning

By Thomas DeVere Wolsey

Happy Mother’s Day to our readers and to my terrific Literacy Beat co-bloggers!

Rose

By TDWolsey

Have you spent time searching the App Store for just the right learning game only to download an app and find it was not quite what you imagined? One of my favorite new sites is iGameMom where the contributors review learning apps for mobile devices they believe are worthy for children of different ages. Finding the right learning game is easy on iGameMom. The site is well-organized with reviews grouped by age and subject area. Because this blog focuses on literacy, this post highlights that section of iGameMom. However, there are many cool apps in other subject areas to check out.

Within the literacy category, you can locate apps for developing letter recognition and related skills, spelling, reading, and language. Recently, iGameMom reviewed Expand Vocabulary with Word Art, a game that pairs humorous artwork (as you know, Literacy Beat often features topics related to visual literacy, so this app was a great find!) with vocabulary learning in a game environment.  Apps reviewed on iGameMom can also be located by the price including those that are free. If you download an app, you may want to use the link provided on the site because it helps to support the site without any cost to you for doing so.

iGameMom

iGameMom: Games for Learning

In addition, there are several resources from the web linked on iGameMom that you may find useful. A list of free apps for iPad that iGameMom recommends are grouped by topic or skill to be developed.  The literacy-related lists include vocabulary development, handwriting (yep, handwriting—still an art in our digital age!), storytelling, grammar and more.

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