Exploring Digital Assessments: How Teachers Improve Learning Outcomes

By Thomas DeVere Wolsey

EduForum 2018 at The American University in Cairo, New Cairo, Egypt

November 3, 2018

Assessment is the fuel of learning. Confronted with mountains of data, teachers can feel overwhelmed.  Particularly frustrating, some assessments interrupt instruction and distract students. In this session, we explore how to make the climb over the data mountain manageable. We will investigate effective practices to align assessments and learning outcomes through technology-driven formative assessment. Embedding assessment directly into learning activities can help teachers adjust instruction and engage students with their learning at the same time.  Learn how to create electronic exit tickets. Make a game your students will enjoy while making real-time use of feedback based on their progress through the game environment. Assessment need not be a tedious chore. Put learning assessment in service of engaging learning environments.

As part of today’s presentation on digital tools for formative assessment, we used Survey Monkey to conduct a pre-assessment of what we know about assessments.

Formative Assessment

Next, we used Edmodo to create a short portfolio with images. Next, we explored project-based learning using an online portfolio at Dreamdo. Here is an example:  https://edu.dream.do/en/dreams/sciences/the-5th-grade-geology-unit

Games are great learning tools, but they can be very useful for assessment, as well. Three online games and assessment tools we tried out were OLogy, Sim Scientist, and Kahoot!

The power of the teacher’s human voice coupled with images of a student’s own work were the focus of our exploration of screencasting.  Cambridge English videos showed us how to use screencapture and a free screencapture program, Jing,  were demonstrated.

Online tools make generating rubrics a snap. Check these out:

*Teachnology offers rubrics at: http://www.teach-nology.com/web_tools/rubrics/ but you’ll need to register.
*Rubistar, a project of ALTEC, has a useful rubric generator available at: http://rubistar.4teachers.org/index.php
*Google add-in by dostuffgood.org Create and send customizable rubrics and scores to students by email for any assignment. https://chrome.google.com/webstore/detail/online-rubric/fiiglmgmcodoglllnbfebbhkfidikfbo?utm_source=permalink

Finally, we examined the role and possibilities of Big Data and educational assessment. Read more here and here.

800px-DARPA_Big_Data

 

 

 

 

 

Want to join our classroom? Navigate to classroom.google.com and enter the code in the image below. Some of the tasks have expired links, but you can see how the demonstration was set up.

Class Code

Learn more about EduForum 2018:

Link: http://eduforum-eg.com/index.php/sessions/exploring-assessments-how-teachers-improve-learning-outcomes/

Link: https://events.aucegypt.edu/?event=14151038

 

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Anticipation Guides | Guías de Anticipación

By Thomas DeVere Wolsey

In this post, we share downloadable resources for creating anticipation guides in English and in Spanish.

En esta publicación, compartimos recursos descargables para crear guías de anticipación en inglés y en español.

Anticipation Guides

Anticipation Guides are instructional routines to activate prior knowledge, encourage predictions, and stimulate curiosity about a topic (Head & Readence, 1986). The teacher prepares a list of five to ten statements related to a text. They are designed as true/false or agree/disagree statements to engage students to think and make connections actively before reading. This strategy is useful because students purposefully read the text to prove or disprove their responses to the statements. They are encouraged to change their responses on the basis of newly acquired information. A discussion about the statements, questions, and new inquiries should follow the reading (Fisher & Frey, 2004).

Anticipation Guides are an instructional routine that provides students with an opportunity to activate prior knowledge, make predictions, actively think about what they will learn, and set a purpose for reading while they develop a natural curiosity about the text.  Download anticipation guide templates in English and Spanish and watch a video demonstrating how to use the guides on The Teacher Toolkit website.

Students

Students | Estudiantes

Guías de anticipación

Las guías de anticipación son rutinas de instrucción para activar el conocimiento previo, fomentar las predicciones y estimular la curiosidad sobre un tema (Head y Readence, 1986). El maestro prepara una lista de cinco a diez declaraciones relacionadas con un texto. Se diseñan como declaraciones de tipo verdadero/falso o de acuerdo/en desacuerdo para llevar a los alumnos a pensar y a hacer conexiones activamente antes de leer. Esta estrategia es útil porque los alumnos leen el texto con propósito, para probar o refutar sus respuestas a las declaraciones. Se les anima a cambiar sus respuestas de acuerdo con información recién adquirida. Una discusión acerca de las declaraciones, preguntas y nuevas indagaciones debe venir después de la lectura (Fisher y Frey, 2004).

Las guías de anticipación son una rutina de enseñanza que les ofrecen a los alumnos una oportunidad para activar el conocimiento previo, hacer predicciones, pensar activamente acerca de lo que aprenderán, y fijar un propósito para leer mientras desarrollan una curiosidad natural acerca del texto. Descargue plantillas de guía de anticipación en inglés y español y vea un video que demuestra cómo usar las guías en el sitio web de The Teacher Toolkit.

References

Fisher, D., & Frey, N. (2004). Improving adolescent literacy: Strategies at work. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson/Merrill/Prentice Hall.

Head, M. H., & Readence, J.E. (1986). Anticipation guides: Meaning through prediction. In E. K. Dishner, T.W. Bean, J.E. Readence, & D.W. Moore (Eds.). Reading in the content areas (2nd ed.). (pp. 229-234). Dubuque, IA: Kendall-Hunt.

Preserving Indigenous Language

Cultivating home languages in the classroom. 

By Thomas DeVere Wolsey, Alan N. Crawford, and Frances Dixon

On a mountaintop surrounded by clouds and rainforest, students gather for classes. The students here all came from the surrounding villages where Q’anjob’al, a Mayan language, is spoken.  The school serves students aged 12 to 18, and many go on to university. At times, students have even been known to inflate their ages so they can attend; the desire to learn is that great.

 

 

The students at Maya Jaguar come to preserve their heritage as Mayans, to learn Spanish, and to bring the best of the world beyond their villages back home. Alumni from Maya Jaguar return to the villages as nurses and teachers.  Most of the teachers at the school speak Q’anjob’al and Spanish.

To read the entire article, please download Preserving Indigenous Language (click the link) or join the International Literacy Association to stay current with literacy topics and issues all year long.

Resources:

 

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